What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on April 7th, 2015

Tonight’s menu:

Baked sweet potatoes topped with Hominy Chili and cheese

Green salad with baby spinach, red bell peppers, celery

Sliced apples

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on March 25th, 2015

Every once in a while, I like to get a little grit in my teeth.  By grit, I mean grits, coarsely dried ground corn that is often thought of as a breakfast alternative to oatmeal. Grits can also be served as a side dish, similar to risotto or polenta.  Grits is not a typical dish here in Vermont but I hail from Maryland, which gives me slightly more southern roots albeit not really southern enough to call grits a staple food.  Regardless, tonight, dinner took a swing south and it was delish.

Tonight’s menu:

Cajun Shrimp and Grits 

Sliced tomatoes

Steamed green beans

Orange slices

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on March 9th, 2015

Tonight’s Menu:

Butternut Bisque

Grilled cheese sandwich

Steamed broccoli

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on February 21st, 2015

Tonight’s menu:

Pork tenderloin roasted with thyme sprigs, sliced pears, sliced red onion, 2 tbsp honey, and 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Steamed broccoli

Mashed potatoes

 

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on February 15th, 2015

As much as I try, I can’t resist soup during the winter.  Not only does it warm the bones, but it is also a great way to get multiple meals in the amount of time it takes to make one.  Set aside some for leftovers or even better, share half the pot with neighbors.

Tonight’s menu:

White bean and kale soup

Green salad with slivered almonds and pomegranate seeds

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on February 12th, 2015

Tonight’s menu:

Linguini with mushroom sauce, sautéed kale, and chicken tenderloins (Heat olive oil in large skillet over medium-low heat. Add shiitake mushrooms, garlic, and chicken tenderloins. Cook, until mushrooms tender and chicken cooked through.  Add 1 cup water and cook until liquid reduced by half, about 5 minutes.  Add kale, sauté briefly and then remove from heat.  Add fresh chopped parsley and grated Parmesan)

Green salad

Sliced pears

 

Heeeeeee-kah-mah!

Written by amy on February 10th, 2015

jicama  Try something new from the produce section this week and get crazy with jicama! Jicama (pronounced HEE-kah-mah) is a root vegetable of Mexican origin that can now be found in most grocery stores.  To eat, first remove the thin brown outer skin.  The white inside has a crisp, crunchy texture and mild sweet starchy taste, like an unripe pear or sweet potato. Most often served raw, here are three recipes to get you started.  Jicama is also excellent cooked, such as in stir fries. 

Ham and Jicama Wraps – divided evenly, wrap 6 jicama or celery sticks with 3 slices of ham. Serve with 1 tsp whole grain mustard for dipping.

Creamy Herb Dip with Vegetables – serve raw vegetables, such as jicama sticks, snap peas, carrot sticks, or thinly sliced beets with a creamy dip. To make dip, blend together 5 oz goat cheese, ½ cup plain low fat yogurt, 1 tbsp chopped fresh dill, 1 tbsp chopped fresh flat leaf parsley, 1 tsp lemon juice, ¼ tsp salt.

Strawberry Mango Jicama salad – make a fruit salad of sliced strawberries, chopped mango, chopped jicama, chopped fresh cilantro, and lime juice. 

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on February 9th, 2015

Tonight’s dinner is based off a recipe, I found in Everyday Food.  To get the right balance across food groups, I bumped up the amount of vegetables and added a small salad as the side dish.

Orecchiette with sausage, chard, and parsnips

Green salad

Pomegranate seeds and grapes

 

 

To milk or not to milk? And if you milk which milk? Those are the questions.

Written by amy on February 1st, 2015

nondairy milkWorking in a pediatricians’ office, I find that I am often asked the same questions by different parents, showing that there are pretty common concerns amongst parents. One frequently asked question is which type of milk should I give my child? Living in the state of Vermont (aka Cows-R-Us) and with the strong marketing presence from the New England Dairy Council, dairy remains a strong part of the American diet. However, over the past few years, there have been a growing number of milk alternatives on grocery shelves, offering parents an option other than cow milk.  When choosing a type of milk and when ethics are not a deciding factor, it is important to understand the different nutrients found in each type of milk.  Some children, such as toddlers, require a higher fat content in their diet and benefit from a milk with a higher fat content.  As always, the best foods tends to be the ones with the least amount of added ingredients, particularly added sugars.  Also, supplementing a food with nutrients does not appear to be as beneficial as ones in which the nutrients are naturally found.  Use the chart below to help understand the different nutritional composition from the various “milks” in the food supply.

Milks compared

 

What’s Amy eating?

Written by amy on January 30th, 2015

Running late from work, a pair of hungry kids, and only 1 hour before we have to leave for swim team practice.  Short on time, short on energy, short on patience, short on inspiration. Sound familiar? For nights like this, I have a mental list of quick, easy dinners that are largely comprised of staple items, ensuring that the ingredients should be on hand.  I also stick to the basic principle of including at least three different food groups at the meal, one of which is a protein food and another of which is a vegetable.

Tonight’s menu:

Hominy Chili

Baked sweet potatoes (in a time crunch, you can poke a few holes in a sweet potato with a fork and then microwave until soft, approximately 5-8 minutes depending on the size)

Carrot sticks

Sliced apples